Links for Week 50 of 2015

As I use the web I routinely bookmark various things using Pinboard. Each week I aggregate these bookmarks and share them on my blog.

AWS API Gateway for Fun and Profit - blog dot lusis (blog.lusis.org)
This is to discuss a specific AWS service and how it can really change the nature of ChatOps and more.
State of On-Call 2015 (victorops.com)
The clear signal over the last year has been the death of operations as the lone protectors of highly technical infrastructures and systems. More and more organizations are placing developers on the front line of rapid response and resolution of technical problems. Alerting ‘someone’ to a problem is no longer acceptable and we are seeing this in many companies as they dismantle their Network Operations Centers (NOCs) in favor of routing specific system problems to the engineers that built the part of the system having issues.
Untangling the Tale of Ada Lovelace—Stephen Wolfram Blog (blog.stephenwolfram.com)
Ada Lovelace was born 200 years ago today. To some she is a great hero in the history of computing; to others an overestimated minor figure. I’ve been curious for a long time what the real story is. And in preparation for her bicentennial, I decided to try to solve what for me has always been the “mystery of Ada”.
Cloudcraft (cloudcraft.co)
Optimized for AWS Design your cloud architecture in a snap with our rich set of AWS components, including: EC2 nodes of all types and sizes Auto Scaling Groups Availability Zones Elastic Load
Scale Up and Delegate Out, with GTD - Next Action Associates (www.next-action.eu)
Scalability is the holy grail of good business practice–both for big companies looking to get bigger, and one-person bands just starting out.
Sumo Logic Sets the Bar for Security in the Cloud with ISO 27001 Certification - Sumo Logic (www.sumologic.com)
First Cloud-Native Data Analytics Vendor to Secure ISO Certification; Provides Customers with the Highest Level of Compliance Certifications to Secure Data in the Cloud
New – Route 53 Traffic Flow | AWS Official Blog (aws.amazon.com)
In order to make it easier for you to build and run cloud-based applications that embody these characteristics, we introduced a new Traffic Flow feature for Amazon Route 53 last week. You can use this feature to build a routing system that uses a combination of geographic location, latency, and availability to route traffic from your users to your cloud or on-premises endpoints.
Improve your communication with TextExpander (brettterpstra.com)
TextExpander improves your communication. Add consistency and efficiency to your emails and messages, and prevent embarrassing errors.
WordPress 4.4 “Clifford” (wordpress.org)
Version 4.4 of WordPress, named “Clifford” in honor of jazz trumpeter Clifford Brown, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.4 make your site more connected and responsive. Clifford also introduces a new default theme, Twenty Sixteen.
The Best Books I Read in 2015 | Bill Gates (www.gatesnotes.com)
just looked over the list of books I read this year, and I noticed a pattern. A lot of them touch on a theme that I would call “how things work.” Some explain something about the physical world, like how steel and glass are used, or what it takes to get rid of deadly diseases. Others offer deep insights into human beings: our strengths and flaws, our capacity for lifelong growth, or the things we value. I didn’t set out to explore these themes intentionally, though in retrospect it make a lot of sense since the main reason I read is to learn.
Uncommon Sense - live @ WDS | Derek Sivers (sivers.org)
So I dusted off this talk from 2011, which I thought I’d never do again, but was useful in this emergency, also because my 2011 book was just re-released this year. They’re old stories for me, but new and useful to most people, so I swallowed my pride and made the best of it. It turned out really wonderful, loose, and fun. I’m so glad I did it.
Promise You A Rose Garden - An essay about system management (markburgess.org)
A promise is like an arrow, something fired from a human, a business, a computer or other party, to another. Each one carries a claim about its originator, to the receiver (who, by the way, has no direct influence on the content of the promise). Each promise is aimed at a single recipient, but the promiser can fire similar arrows at any number of targets to repeat the promise. Promises are non-transferable and constrain only the promiser, never the promisee. Duplicating a promise to the same recipient has no effect, but repeating a promise with a change added would be a promise broken.